Services

Eliminate the need for glasses and contact lenses.

Laser Eye Surgery

If you’re nearsighted, farsighted or have an astigmatism, our Advanced PRK Laser Eye Surgery is considered one of the safest laser eye surgery procedures available. Highly effective and gentle, it improves your vision and is less likely to cause dry eye like LASIK often does. Surgery is performed on an outpatient basis, takes less than 30 minutes to complete and your treatment includes free enhancements and adjustments for the first 18 months after surgery.

Immediately following surgery, you’ll notice an improvement in your vision and will feel more confident, enjoy a better quality of life, be more active and can finally stop wearing glasses and contact lenses.

Nearsighted? Farsighted? Have an astigmatism? Advanced PRK Laser Eye Surgery may help.

The cornea is the transparent front portion of your eye that covers the iris, pupil and anterior chamber and allows light to focus more clearly. If you have a thin cornea, irregularly shaped cornea, chronic dry eyes, or prescriptions, Advanced PRK is an ideal procedure for you.

During Advanced PRK treatment, the laser only touches the surface of the cornea, which reduces the invasiveness of the surgery and preserves the thickness of your cornea. With no incisions made to your eye’s cornea, this surgery is much safer than LASIK and also poses fewer postoperative complications.

Advanced PRK corrects:

Nearsightedness

You can see things up close clearly, however objects in the distance appear blurred. It’s difficult to drive, play sports and do activities that require distance vision.

Farsightedness

Objects at a distance are clear, however those close by are hard to see. Reading small print may be challenging and you may experience fatigue, headaches and aching or burning eyes.

Astigmatism

With an astigmatism, it’s difficult to see objects close-up and at a far distance. You may experience general eye discomfort and headaches.

Suffering from chronic dry, irritated eyes?

Dry Eye Treatment

Dry Eye affects over 300 million people worldwide – and many Calgarians considering our dry weather. Symptoms include increased evaporation of tears, unstable tear film, damage to the eye surface, inflammation and discomfort and a decrease in vision.

If you have dry eyes, rely on drops for temporary relief and believe it may just be sensitive eyes or seasonal allergies, you may actually have Dry Eye. The good news is that we offer Lipiflow and IPL treatment and we can help you decide which option is best for you.

The only FDA-approved device that removes gland blockages and restores Meibomian glands function to get at the root of the condition.

The Meibomian glands in our eyelids normally produce a protective oily layer of the tear film, protect the ocular surface from disease and prevent the watery part of tears from evaporating when our eyes are open. Without these oils, our eyes are more susceptible to dry climates, air conditioning, computer use, reading, and other activities that impact the long-term health of our eyes.

During Lipiflow, a drop of mild anesthetic is administered to your eye(s), followed by a procedure that loosens debris around the edge of the eyelids. LipiFlow activator eye pieces are then gently placed on the eyelids and you’ll begin to feel warmth and gentle pressure. The device has two 6-minute cycles – a warming phase, followed by intermittent pulsations, and then pressure, which removes blockages from the glands. You’ll experience little to no discomfort during treatment and will start to see relief 4 to 6 weeks after treatment.

IPL reduces eyelid inflammation that causes dry, itchy eyes.

During IPL (Intense Pulsed Light) treatment, we apply coupling gel to the skin and you may experience a warm sensation as intense pulsed light is applied to the skin. Following treatment, we perform Meibomian gland expression, which accelerates the healing process.

After treatment, you may experience some redness around the treated areas, which usually disappears within a few hours. In most cases, makeup may be applied immediately, and daily activities can be resumed, however you’ll need to stay out of direct sunlight for a few days and apply sunscreen.

Dry eye can be relieved with as few as 3 treatments, which are ideally done every 3 to 4 weeks. Maintenance treatments may be required 6-12 months after. Please note this is not laser.

Drops to lubricate the eyes to alleviate dry eye symptoms.

In most cases of chronic dry eyes, patients may be recommended to use artificial tears on a regular basis to lubricate and moisten the eyes in order to alleviate the symptoms.

When considering the use of artificial tears, it is recommended that you consult your doctor in case you have any allergies. Like all eye drops, when using artificial tears please be sure to avoid letting the tip of the tube or dropper to come in contact with the eye or any other surface. If the eyedropper gets contaminated it may cause further discomfort in the eye or cause an infection.

Artificial tears do not require any prescription. There is not a specific brand of artificial tears that will work for all patients. Plus, depending on your preferences of comfort, you may prefer to use drops of varying thickness. Some patients will prefer to use artificial tears that are more fluid (like water) while other will prefer a thicker (gel-like) viscosity. Preservative-free drops are recommended.

Used to treat inflamed or infected chronic dry eye.

In cases where chronic dry eyes are inflamed and/or infected, medicated steroids and antibiotics eye drops may be prescribed by your doctor to treat the inflammation and infection, respectively. Like all eye drops, please be sure to avoid letting the tip of the tube or dropper come in contact with the eye or any other surface.

Increase the eye’s tear film naturally.

Also known as punctum plugs, lacrimal plugs or occluders, punctal plugs are very tiny devices that are inserted into the eyes tear ducts in order to block drainage. In turn, this increases the eye’s tear film, naturally increasing surface moisture and relieving the discomfort caused by dry eyes.

Your eye doctor will recommend the use of non-dissolvable punctal plugs as treatment for your dry eyes. It is not recommended that you attempt to remove punctal plugs on your own. If you are experiencing any discomfort or are concerned that the plugs are causing problems, please contact your eye doctor to have them safely removed.

Inserting the punctal plugs into the eye’s tear ducts can be done painlessly, usually requiring no more than 2 minutes to complete.

Drops that help increase the eye’s natural ability to produce tears.

Restasis opthalmic emulsion is a specially medicated eye drop that helps increase the eye’s natural ability to produce tears and therefore keep your eyes feeling moist and comfortable. Restasis reduces the inflammation associated with dry eye disease. By reducing inflammation, the eyes will slowly improve their ability to produce tears naturally.

Restasis drops are usually recommended for daily use over the course of 2 to 6 months and can be safely used by those that wear contact lenses or glasses. Like all eye drops, when using Restasis please be sure to avoid letting the tip of the tube or dropper coming in contact with the eye or any other surface. Restasis drops are available at all pharmacies.

Eliminate the need for reading glasses or bifocals.

Refractive Lens Exchange

When we’re young, our eye’s lens is soft and flexible and able to change shape to see images from different distances. With age, the natural lens in the eye hardens and loses elasticity and can no longer adjust to focus on near objects.

Refractive Lens Exchange treats Presbyopia, Myopia, Hyperopia, and Astigmatism. RLE is typically performed on patients over 45 or younger patients who are not good candidates for laser corneal surgery. If you have any of the following symptoms, you may benefit from this procedure:

  • Eye strain or headaches after reading
  • Difficulty reading small print or focusing on near objects
  • Needing brighter lighting when reading or doing close work
  • Holding reading material at arm’s distance to focus properly

During Refractive Lens Exchange (RLE) surgery, the natural lens is removed surgically and replaced with an artificial intraocular lens (IOL), which frees you from glasses and contact lenses.

We offer Monofocal and Multifocal lenses, and can determine which option is best. Standard Monofocal lenses provide clear vision, however glasses will still be required for many tasks. Multifocal lenses provide high-quality vision for near, intermediate and distance vision, in most lighting conditions.

We offer Monofocal and Multifocal lenses, and can determine which option is best. Standard Monofocal lenses provide clear vision, however glasses will still be required for many tasks. Multifocal lenses provide high-quality vision for near, intermediate and distance vision, in most lighting conditions.

Mitchell Eye Centre has a wide range of advanced technology intraocular lens implants available. There is no single lens that works best for all patients and lifestyles. Consult with your doctor to select the most appropriate lens implant that fits your needs

Experiencing cloudy vision?

Cataract Surgery

If you experience cloudy or blurry vision, sensitivity to light, trouble seeing at night, fading colours, double vision or frequent prescription changes in your glasses or contact lenses, you may benefit from cataract surgery.

Cataracts can also worsen from smoking, prolonged exposure to ultraviolet light and various diseases. With our safe and effective cataract surgery, your eye’s clouded lens is removed and replaced with a clear artificial lens implant. Surgery is performed as an outpatient procedure, under local anesthesia and doesn’t require an overnight hospital stay. Mitchell Eye Centre offers two treatments for cataracts and can help determine which one is right for you.

YAG laser treatment is one of the safest treatments available.

YAG removes secondary cataracts by painlessly eliminating the hazy posterior capsule from your line of sight. This allows light to pass through normally, which restores your original, clear vision.

The YAG laser doesn’t actually make any incisions or “cuts” into the eye. The procedure is totally painless and is completed in less than 10 minutes. Healing is quick, with little to no discomfort following the procedure and improvement in your eyesight within 48 hours.

Remove cataracts by placing a new intraocular lense into place.

Using an ultrasonic probe, the lens is fragmented and removed from the eye with suction. The surgeon then puts a new intraocular lens into place. One of the most commonly performed surgeries worldwide, cataract surgery is safe and offers results that last a lifetime.

Healing is quick, you should experience no discomfort or pain following the procedure and you’ll see improvement in your eyesight within 48 hours.

We carry a selection of enhanced lens implants for patients undergoing cataract removal.

The standard recovery time following cataract or refractive lens exchange is 1 to 2 days. To ensure proper healing and long-term improvement to your vision, you’ll need to avoid heavy lifting, using swimming pools and hot tubs, and participating in any contact sports.

For the first 2 weeks following surgery, you’ll use medicated eye drops as directed. It’s important to note that with some levels of astigmatism, an additional procedure like laser enhancement may be needed to “fine tune” your new lens. Each patient is assessed individually and recommendations will be given based on your medical history and how well your eyes adjust to the new lenses.

Experiencing sudden flashes or floaters?

Retina Surgery

Our medical team includes an experienced retina specialist who treats a wide range of retina disorders and conditions, including: flashes, floaters, diabetic retinopathy, retinal detachment, vein or artery occlusion, retinopathy or age-related macular degeneration.

We treat retinal disorders through a number of procedures, including: intravitreal anti-VEGF injections, Steroid Injections, vitrectomy, epiretinal membrane peel, floaterectomy, scleral buckling surgery or pneumatic retinopathy

If you’re diagnosed with a retina disorder, we may prescribe an anti-VEGF medication.

If you are diagnosed with wet age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, retinal artery or vein occlusion, or any other condition leading to macular edema you will be prescribed intravitreal injections of an anti-VEGF medication. The three most prevalent anti-VEGF medications currently used are Avastin, Lucentis, and Eylea.

Avastin is a medication that is used to reduce swelling and abnormal blood vessel growth. It was originally developed for the treatment of colon cancer but has gained worldwide acceptance for the successful treatment of several eye conditions. The company that developed this medication has never applied to Health Canada or the FDA to seek approval for intraocular use. It remains approved only for cancer treatment, and therefore its use in the treatment of eye conditions is considered “off label”.

In contrast, Lucentis and Eylea were developed for intraocular use, and are approved by both the FDA and Health Canada for the treatment of some eye conditions. Lucentis and Avastin are very similar on a molecular level. In fact, Lucentis is just the active fragment of the larger Avastin molecule, and therefore they work very similarly. All three of these medications are used frequently by retinal specialists, and your retinal specialist will help determine which medication is right for your eye. Eylea is a VEGF trap, which is a different type of molecule than Avastin and Lucentis.

Avastin, Lucentis and Eylea work by reducing swelling and also inhibiting abnormal blood vessel growth. They have truly been a major advance in the treatment of retinal conditions, and one of the most exciting innovations in modern medicine in the last decade. Prior to these medications, the treatment options for many retinal problems were very limited and ineffective. Lucentis and Avastin injections have saved the vision of countless patients world-wide who would otherwise have almost certainly been blinded without treatment. While the treatment may sound scary, you can rest assured that the injections are almost always safe and painless.

Typically, injections are started on a monthly basis for the first few months of treatment. After the first three injections, the need for ongoing treatment is re-evaluated. Most patients do require ongoing injections even after the first few months, but often no longer need the medication on such a frequent basis. Dr. Mitchell or Dr. Adatia will tailor your treatment to your eye’s specific needs, ensuring you receive only as much medication as is necessary to maintain your vision.

After injections, the following post injection instructions are very important:

  • Keep your eye clean and avoid dusty, dirty or windy environments for 48 hours
  • Do not get any water in your eye for at least 48 hours, including while in the shower. Do not swim or use a hot tub for at least 48 hours.
  • Do not rub your eye. If the eye feels irritated use a fresh bottle of artificial tears to lubricate and soothe the eye. These are provided to you at the time of the injection. Do not use old, previously opened bottles of tears as their sterility cannot be guaranteed.
  • Avoid travel outside of Canada for at least 4 days after an injection. In the extremely rare event that a complication develops, it is important that you have prompt access to medical care. If you take medication eye drops in the injected eye you may restart them the day after the injection.
  • It is normal following an injection to experience some aching or irritation in the eye. Most of this irritation is actually due to the drops used to sterilize and numb the eye for the procedure, and should subside within 12 to 24 hours. If the pain persists for longer than this you should contact our office. It is also common to notice some bleeding and redness on the white part of the eye after an injection. This is harmless to the eye but can take 7-10 days to resolve, during which time the eye should be painless.
  • It is extremely rare to develop an infection inside the eye, also known as endophthalmitis, after an injection. However, it is very important to identify this complication as soon as possible if it develops. Typically, symptoms include worsening pain (past the initial 12-24 hours), progressive reduced vision, worsening light sensitivity, and worsening redness or discharge from the eye. Please contact our office immediately at 403-258-1773 or seek medical care if any of these symptoms develop.

Finally, several studies have investigated injections in the eye and shown them to be safe for your general health. Nonetheless, because these medications influence blood vessels there is a theoretical risk of stroke, heart attack, blood clots in the legs or lungs, or gastrointestinal side effects. If symptoms develop that suggest any of these conditions, please seek immediate care at your nearest emergency department.

Recommended when topical drops are unsuccessful.

If you are diagnosed with uveitis or any condition resulting in macular edema, your retinal specialist may recommend steroid injections as part of your treatment. Typically, steroid injections are performed when topical drops are inadequate to treat the condition and oral steroids are not desired due to potential side effects.

Unlike Lucentis or Avastin injections, steroid injections are typically required at most once every few months, and usually do not require frequent repeated injections. While the treatment may sound scary, you can rest assured that the injections are almost always painless. It is important to follow up with your retinal specialist usually two weeks after the injection to assess the effect of the medication and to ensure no side effects occur from the injection. The most frequent side effects include increased eye pressure, or glaucoma, and cataract formation.

Performed to repair retina detachment or to remove floaters.

Vitrectomy, which involves removing a vitreous gel from the eye, is performed as part of an epiretinal membrane peel or to repair retinal detachments or remove floaters. After surgery, patients usually have to maintain a face down position for at least 10 days to ensure the procedure is successful.

Performed to remove floaters—a common ocular condition.

Floaters are a very common ocular complaint. They are caused by opacities in the vitreous gel, which cast shadows on the retina. These are interpreted by the brain as floaters in the vision. As the eye ages these floaters become more prevalent, particularly if the vitreous gel separates completely from the retina (a process called posterior vitreous separation).

A floaterectomy (also known as a Floaters only vitrectomy, or FOV) is a procedure in which the vitreous gel is removed from the eye and replaced with a clear saline fluid. The instruments used are extremely small and therefore the incisions rarely require sutures, resulting in minimal postoperative discomfort.

While floaters can be frustrating they do not actually cause any ongoing structural damage to the eye. The symptoms will also sometimes resolve with watchful waiting. Therefore, floaterectomy surgery, or FOV, is not considered a medically necessary procedure and is not covered by Alberta Health Care.

The surgery is performed at Southern Alberta Eye Centre, and you can go home immediately after your surgery. It is recommended that a friend or family member accompany you on the day of your procedure. You will have a patch on the operated eye and will be unable to drive afterwards. The patch will be removed on your postoperative day 1 visit with your doctor. In almost all cases the surgery is performed using local anesthesia rather than general anesthesia, although general anesthesia is available as an option.

Typically, patients are seen 1 day, 1 week, and 1 month following their surgery. During the first two weeks after surgery there are a number of activities that are not recommended. These include driving, any activities requiring lifting more than 10 lbs, or getting water in your eye (including while bathing). Avoid any activities that would require bending at the waist. You should also avoid reading, using computers or mobile devices. Watching TV is ok, provided it is from a distance of 6 feet or more. Activities performed at a distance require far less eye movement or strain compared with activities done within arm’s length. Traveling by air during the first month after surgery is strongly discouraged. In some circumstances an air bubble may be intentionally left in the eye during the surgery to facilitate healing and in these circumstances air travel is absolutely contraindicated until the air bubble has disappeared.

Scleral buckling is an option for treating retinal detachment.

Scleral buckling surgery is one option for treating retinal detachment. During this procedure, a very small piece of silicone band or sponge is placed on the outside of the eye and sutured permanently in place. This pushes the outer wall (sclera) of the eye inwards, closing the retinal break and allowing the retina to reattach.

One of the benefits of scleral buckling surgery is that the risk of developing a cataract after the surgery is much lower than the risk of cataract formation after vitrectomy surgery. There is also no entry of instruments into the eye, and usually there is no need to position face down after the surgery. However, because sutures are required to secure the conjunctiva during the surgery, there is usually more postoperative discomfort with a scleral buckle compared with vitrectomy or pneumatic retinopexy. These sutures are absorbable, but usually some pain medication is required for the first week after scleral buckling surgery.

Scleral buckle surgery is performed at Rockyview Hospital, and you will not need to stay in the hospital after your surgery. It is recommended that a friend or family member accompany you to the hospital on the day of your procedure. You will have a patch on the operated eye and will be unable to drive afterwards. The patch will be removed the day after surgery on your postoperative day 1 visit with your retinal specialist. Both general anaesthesia and local anaesthesia are options for this procedure, and can be discussed with the anaesthetist at the time of your surgery.

Typically, patients are seen 1 day, 1 week, and 1 month following their surgery. During the first two weeks after surgery there are a number of activities that are not recommended. These include driving, any activities requiring lifting more than 10 lbs, or getting water in your eye (including while bathing). Avoid any activities that would require bending at the waist. You should also avoid reading, using computers or mobile devices. Watching TV is ok, provided it is from a distance of 6 feet or more. Activities performed at a distance require far less eye movement or strain compared with activities done within arm’s length. Traveling by air during the first month after surgery is strongly discouraged. In some circumstances, an air bubble may be intentionally left in the eye during the surgery to facilitate healing. In these circumstances air travel is absolutely contraindicated until the air bubble has disappeared.

Scleral buckles are often used in younger patients with retinal detachments, as the consequences of cataract formation are more significant in young patients. The configuration and extent of the detachment are the primary factors in deciding whether to use a scleral buckle, vitrectomy, pneumatic retinopexy, or a combination of these techniques. Ultimately, if you are suffering from a retinal detachment, your retinal specialist will advise you on which of these options is the best for your eye.

An alternative option to treating retinal detachment.

Pneumatic retinopexy is one option for treating retinal detachment. Typically, it is considered when there is one retinal tear in the upper half of the retina. It can also be used if there is more than one tear, provided the tears are very close to each other. Usually the retinal detachment also needs to be of very recent onset. In the event you have a retinal detachment, your retinal specialist will examine your eye and determine if this procedure is right for you.

During this procedure, a small gas bubble in injected into the back of the eye. The gas bubble then expands and pushes the retina back in place. Once the retina is reattached, laser retinopexy or cryotherapy is applied around the retinal tear(s), causing a scar to form that holds the retina in place permanently. This part of the procedure may happen on the same day or a few days after the bubble is placed inside the eye. Unlike scleral buckling or vitrectomy surgery (the other two major options for retinal detachment repair), pneumatic retinopexy is performed in the office and does not require a trip to the operating room.

Positioning after pneumatic retinopexy is critical to the success of the procedure. The gas bubble needs to be pushing against the retina and closing the retinal tear, and this usually requires the patient to maintain a face down position after the procedure. Depending on the exact location of the tear, the positioning will vary and your retinal specialist will give clear individualized instructions for positioning on a case-by-case basis. The positioning after pneumatic retinopexy and other retinal procedures is a challenging part of the process, but plays a large part in determining the success of many of these procedures. Typically, the positioning needs to be maintained for 10 to 14 days after the procedure.

The gas bubble eventually is absorbed into the bloodstream and is replaced in the eye by clear fluid. Until the bubble resolves it is very important that patients do not fly or experience significant changes in altitude. The change in altitude causes gas to expand, which increases the pressure in the eye causing irreversible damage. It is also important that any other physicians or dentists providing treatment are made aware that there is a gas bubble in your eye. Certain other medications, particularly inhaled anesthetics can also cause expansion of the gas bubble and increased eye pressure. Your retinal specialist will let you know when the gas bubble has resolved and it is safe to travel by air.

Have younger-looking eyes.

Cosmetic Eyelid Surgery

Mitchell Eye Centre also specializes in cosmetic procedures that help you look younger, including Blepharoplasty Cosmetic Eye Surgery.

More commonly known as an “eye lift”, blepharoplasty is a surgical procedure to remove excess skin and fat from the eyelids. It is performed under local anesthetic and is usually completed within half an hour. After healing, this procedure will have you looking more youthful, alert, and rested. Your eyelids will be lighter and you will feel fresher.

Typical recovery time is short. Sutures dissolve or are removed within 3-weeks after surgery. Later, the suture line where the incision was made will also fade. During this time, we recommend that you avoid any activities that might lead to physical contact with the area. As well, do not use swimming pools or hot tubs during the first three weeks.